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Perspectives Monthly Lifestyle eNewsletter for August, 2019

Perspectives Monthly Lifestyle eNewsletter for August, 2019

 

 


SMART TIP:
Want to start working out, but need more motivation and support? Search Facebook or other social media platforms for local, group fitness classes and meetups. You might be surprised by what events are available in your area!

 

WHO SAID IT?
“Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.”
[GET THE ANSWER]
 

TEST YOUR
KNOWLEDGE:
Q: Roughly, how many Americans collect Social Security retirement benefits? 

 

A) 44 million

B) 48 million

C) 55 million

D) 59 million

 

[GET THE ANSWER]
 

 

 

August 2019

Why Reading Is Even More Relevant

If knowledge is the most-valuable currency in today’s world, then learning how to learn is an essential skill in this information-centered economy.
[CLICK TO READ]

 

 

Live Long, Stay Invested

For some baby boomers, a long retirement may mean accepting a certain level of investment risk.

[CLICK TO READ]

 

 

Picking Out the Better Proteins

All meats have dietary pros and cons, but some are definitely healthier to consume than others. 
[CLICK TO READ]

 

 

Recipe of the Month
Strawberry & Barley Summer Salad
[CLICK TO READ]

 

 

Perspectives - Page Break

 

 

Why Reading Is Even More Relevant

Only a generation or two ago, the template for learning and career success was fixed. You spent your childhood, adolescence, and young adult years in school, and when your education ended in your twenties, you were ready to spend decades in a well-paying career. Now, the model has changed. Many of us are learning in mid-life, with both present and future jobs in mind, and the more we learn how to learn, the easier it becomes to acquire knowledge.

 

Ben Franklin once wrote that “an investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” So, perhaps it is not surprising that some of the most noted CEOs and entrepreneurs (Bill Gates and Warren Buffett, for example) carve time out of their busy schedules to read – in an information-centered economy, they recognize that knowledge may be the most-valuable currency. One potentially efficient way to pick up more knowledge is to abide by the 5-hour rule: dedicating an hour of each weekday, or simply five hours per week, to reading and learning, whether it pertains to your career field or other subjects. That ongoing commitment may make you a better “generalist” as well as a “specialist,” and it could also open doors to new career and social opportunities.1

 

 

 

Perspectives - Page Break

Live Long, Stay Invested

There was a time when more than 90% of American men older than age 65 worked. To be precise, that time was 1870. Back then, retirement was unheard of; in an economy that was still labor-intensive and largely agricultural, anyone capable of working at that age kept at it.

 

Today, Americans typically retire in their early sixties. While some may work much longer, a retirement lasting 20 to 30 years may turn out to be the more-common experience. What does this mean for retirees, financially? Baby boomers leaving work might have to accept the level of investment risk they do now once retired. Many retirees may be challenged to live merely off Social Security benefits and dividends, with interest rates still not far from historic lows, and even 2% inflation will reduce the purchasing power of an uninvested dollar by almost 50% over 30 years. Moreover, some boomers need to build greater retirement savings. Though we could see more Americans working past age 65 in the near future, many people may still want or need to retire before that age, and if you are among them, you may need to take short-term income needs and long-term investing objectives into account.2     

 

 

Perspectives - Page Break

Picking Out the Better Proteins

Most people recognize some meats are healthier than others: the assumption is that white meat is good and red meat is bad, or at least, less healthy for you. That generalization has merit. Fish is basically the healthiest meat, with wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and oysters containing the highest amount of healthy fats in the meat hierarchy. Turkey and chicken come next, then pork (which when unprocessed, usually has the least calories and saturated fat of any red meat), then beef and lamb, and then processed meats beneath them. 

 

Still, some old presumptions about meats deserve reexamination. When it comes to chicken, the degree of fat in white meat is really about the same as in dark meat. Other recent research asserts that a serving of white meat chicken delivers as much bad cholesterol into your system as a serving of beef. One thing is for certain: processed meats like sausage, pepperoni, and bacon have a definite downside. The World Health Organization classifies such meats as “carcinogenic.” The American Heart Association, for the record, recommends 2 to 3 servings of fish and 8 to 9 servings of extra-lean protein weekly.3